A blog dedicated to providing quotes by and posts relating to one of the most influential (and quotable!) authors of the twentieth century, G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936). If you do not know much about GKC, I suggest visiting the webpage of the American Chesterton Society as well as this wonderful Chesterton Facebook Page by a fellow Chestertonian

I also have created a list detailing examples of the influence of Chesterton if you are interested, that I work on from time to time.

(Moreover, for a list of short GKC quotes, I have created one here, citing the sources)

"...Stevenson had found that the secret of life lies in laughter and humility."

-Heretics (1905)

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"The Speaker" Articles

A book I published containing 112 pieces Chesterton wrote for the newspaper "The Speaker" at the beginning of his career.

They are also available for free electronically on another blog of mine here, if you wish to read them that way.




Sunday, May 29, 2011

Dedications to GKC by Dean Koontz and Terry Pratchett / Neil Gaiman

First, today is GKC's 137th birthday! :-)

Today while at Wal-Mart, I came across another Dean Koontz novel that began with a quote from Chesterton, specifically from GKC's book The Superstition of Divorce. (This is the fourth such Koontz novel I have encountered beginning with a GKC quote). The Koontz novel is "The Dead Town" in his Frankenstein series, and the GKC quote was:

"Man can always be blind to a thing so long as it is big enough. It is so difficult to see the world in which we live."

However, this time the novel was also *dedicated* to GKC as well, so I have reproduced the dedication below:

"To the memory of Gilbert K. Chesterton, who presented wisdom and hard truths in a most appealing package, changing countless lives with kindness and a smile."

It reminds me of another novel that was dedicated to GKC which I do not myself possess, but have heard of. The novel Good Omens, co-written by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett has the following dedication:

"The authors would like to join the demon Crowley in dedicating this book to the memory of G.K. Chesterton, a man who knew what was going on."

(Admittedly it is ironic, given that Chesterton was such a strong Christian, to see the reference to "the demon Crowley", but.... From what I understand, Crowley is one of the characters in the novel; however, I know nothing more, so I can't really comment)

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Crowley is an Fallen Angel, one who "did not so much fall, as saunter vaugely downwards"

The book is very funny, I would recommend that you give it a go.

Margo

Mike said...

Thank-you for the information! :-)