A blog dedicated to providing quotes by and posts relating to one of the most influential (and quotable!) authors of the twentieth century, G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936). If you do not know much about GKC, I suggest visiting the webpage of the American Chesterton Society as well as this wonderful Chesterton Facebook Page by a fellow Chestertonian

I also have created a list detailing examples of the influence of Chesterton if you are interested, that I work on from time to time.

(Moreover, for a list of short GKC quotes, I have created one here, citing the sources)

"...Stevenson had found that the secret of life lies in laughter and humility."

-Heretics (1905)

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"The Speaker" Articles

A book I published containing 112 pieces Chesterton wrote for the newspaper "The Speaker" at the beginning of his career.

They are also available for free electronically on another blog of mine here, if you wish to read them that way.




Wednesday, February 6, 2013

GKC Speaks: Articles from the Speaker

I recently self-published a book of GKC articles which he wrote for The Speaker, both in print form (via CreateSpace) and a Kindle version, in case anybody is interested. (Moreover, I also sent  to the G.K. Chesterton's Works on the Webpage, the best place for online Chesterton texts.  So now they are posted on that website as well, which I greatly appreciate)

It is the first time I have published a book, so no doubt there may be problems, but in case anyone is interested in reading more GKC, there you go.

GKC Speaks: Articles from the Speaker

And for the Kindle edition, you can use this link

Here is the description:

"It must be resolutely proclaimed that into the world of wonder there is no gate but the low gate of humility, through the arch of which the earth shines like elfland." 

G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936), one of the most influential and quotable authors of the twentieth century, began his career as a book reviewer. Among his earliest pieces were those which he contributed to the paper "The Speaker." Many of those pieces were later collected into his book "The Defendant" (1901), but most of the others have been out of print for over a century. This volume contains 24 of those other reviews. While ephemeral in nature in many respects, they nevertheless contain many valubale nuggets of Chesterton's wit and wisdom, and will prove of great interest to devoted Chestertonians.