A blog dedicated to providing quotes by and posts relating to one of the most influential (and quotable!) authors of the twentieth century, G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936). If you do not know much about GKC, I suggest visiting the webpage of the American Chesterton Society as well as this wonderful Chesterton Facebook Page by a fellow Chestertonian

I also have created a list detailing examples of the influence of Chesterton if you are interested, that I work on from time to time.

(Moreover, for a list of short GKC quotes, I have created one here, citing the sources)

"...Stevenson had found that the secret of life lies in laughter and humility."

-Heretics (1905)

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"The Speaker" Articles

A book I published containing 112 pieces Chesterton wrote for the newspaper "The Speaker" at the beginning of his career.

They are also available for free electronically on another blog of mine here, if you wish to read them that way.




Saturday, January 22, 2011

"But grubbing up the dust of an unsuccessful barbarian on the wrong side of the Dark Ages seems to them, I suppose, a most smart form of modernity."

I received the other day a circular from some people who wanted to revive in England the religion of the heathen Saxons- whatever it was. They said (with admirable cheerfulness) that they were "continuing the work of Penda, King of Mercia," who was killed in a tribal skirmish somewhere in the seventh century. I like the phrase "continuing the work." Seeing that poor Penda's work has certainly suffered a slight interruption, having been temporarily suspended for about twelve hundred years, one might have expected that his followers would at least have said "resume the work." But, no; they are in full continuity; they are vividly in touch with Penda; and they do not offically even admit the delay, any more than Charles II. would officially admit the interregnum of the Protectorate. Yet I hear of these people calling themselves Pantheists and talking in Hyde Park in a most modern style. And if you and I were to appeal to the Prayer Book or the Parish Church, or the Council of Trent or the principles of Rousseau's "Social Contract," I daresay they would think us old-fashioned. But grubbing up the dust of an unsuccessful barbarian on the wrong side of the Dark Ages seems to them, I suppose, a most smart form of modernity.

-January 21, 1911, Illustrated London News

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